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  Author    Right - join Part A to Part B etc, etc, etc  (currently 16,328 views)
Brian
Posted on: September 27th, 2013, 22:45:01 Quote Report to Moderator
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Jim, that seems like a quite sensible reading, and jives with what I can see.
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Graham Bichard
Posted on: September 28th, 2013, 14:27:52 Quote Report to Moderator
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Thanks guys.  That does seem a bit clearer Jim, the way you've explained it - I take it if you're able to see the line on a vertical pole at mirror height AND the line on the floor, anything above thatt line height mustn't be important!
I'm planning on both door mirror's and an interior mirror.  I'm not sure the interior mirror alone would satisfy the requirement of the 20m line at 60m - out of interest, any care to comment if the rear field of vision is that good on a MM?
Brian, what do you need to satisfy to get the car registered in the US?  I seem to recall the UK was one of the few (the only) country in Europe who challenged the small volume vehicle rules to allow kit-cars to be built by individuals, when they were last changed by Brussels.  At least it means the cars will be built to a 'reasonable' standard though.  Although who would want to drive around in a car that managed to 'cut corners' I don't know.  (I'm enjoying following your Mk6 progress by the way.  Whatever method of registration you have to employ, you'll soon be overtaking me with the momentum you're building up   )
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Brian
Posted on: September 28th, 2013, 15:49:33 Quote Report to Moderator
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Within the US, California is typically the strictest of all, mostly in terms of smog/emissions.

For example, to bring a car from another country, it typically must meet the emissions and safety features/requirements of the year it was created, as long as the car is 25+ years old. But, in CA, the it's locked to pre-1975, generally making it impossible to import a newer than 1975 car into the state.

However, about 10 years ago, a law was passed in CA that allows the first 500 new kit cars each year to get a perpetual nearly free pass from the requirements. These kit cars that get the pass need to meet the emissions requirements for the year the car "resembles" instead of the current year; if it doesn't resemble an existing vehicle, then it is assigned the requirements for 1960. However, from 1960-68, the only requirement was to have an enclosed crank case. After about 1975, it would start needing smog (emissions) testing every 2 years. I have printouts of the 1965 literature, so I'm assuming I will be classed as either '65, or since there weren't any others sold in the US, then maybe the 1960 default.

As an interesting trivia, the 500 sequence numbers allowing a build, used to all be taken in the first few hours of the first day of the year. Last year, however, there were some leftover at the end of the year. And this year, when I applied in April, I got one in the 30s (out of 500). I guess there aren't so many kit car builds lately.

As for street requirements/testing, I have to do a few tests, none nearly as involved as yours. I'm actually going to try to follow the IVA rules a bit to make sure I'm roadworthy. As for my tests, I have to work with 3 different agencies:
* the highway patrol (CHP -- police officers) to verify that the parts were legally purchased. Normally, I should be able to just take the car there in pieces with receipts, but my local office requires it, as department policy, to require the car to be in "finished state", at least in terms of lights, safety equipment, etc. I presume they will do a check that it complies with laws, such as the correct tires, mirrors, etc -- though nowhere as thorough test as the IVA, I can't tell because it will probably be an officer just looking for illegal stuff.
* after that, I need a local testing company to certify the brakes and lights. They will make sure the headlights are aimed properly, and adjust if needed. They will make sure the brakes perform, and that there is a functioning fluid light. And they will check for a horn, and that all the turn/stop lights work. This is usually the only safety test, if my local CHP didn't have that policy.
* bureau of automotive repair. This is where I need to get the "year" assigned. Then, they will do an emissions test. And as a pre 1975, they will need to test the emissions, and then delete the results in the computer and type in "exempt" in the place.

As for my plans, I had lots of delays in organizing; I had planned on having the shell ordered in Jan, and then delivered in May, etc. The way I registered it, it's going to be best if I meet those trials by the end of the year.

As for progress, I'm working hard to keep my momentum up. I try to go to the garage at least 4 times a week, but sometimes only for a few minutes. Just trying to do "something". Even if it's spending 10 minutes putting tools back, or attaching one thing. Also, I'm trying to keep it so I have at least 2 viable projects to work on at a time. That way when I find I'm missing something for one project and need to order it, I can still get other work done. So far, I've been bouncing from front and rear subframe assembly. And now I can work on fuel/wiring, too.


Last modified September 28th, 2013, 17:12:15 by Brian
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jimnaylor
Posted on: September 30th, 2013, 19:23:09 Quote Report to Moderator
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The top of windscreen mounted interior mirror was so useless on mine I took it out! Some people have dash mounted ones and I think these are better. I also depends a bit how tall you are... an interesting one when checking field of view for a IVA test, as it doesn't specify the height of the tester.
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Brian
Posted on: October 1st, 2013, 19:04:11 Quote Report to Moderator
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Graham,

I'm getting to the stage of setting in the subframes. I had a few questions from things that I wasn't able to catch from your pictures of the process:

* For the rear, did you end up leaving the subframe offset to the right? Or did you do a fill and relocate ite?

* You mentioned that someone warned to get the subframes aligned to avoid crabbing -- did anyone get back to you with what to do there?

But in general, looking at your pictures, I'm a lot more confident in my next few steps here, though it's going to be a pain to get these mounted .

-brian
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Graham Bichard
Posted on: October 13th, 2013, 17:34:47 Quote Report to Moderator
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Got an hour in the garage this afternoon.
I managed to get the boot drain fitted:

And I got the mirrors fitted:


Not sure now whether I like these as much now - they might get changed for some smaller Formula Ford types after IVA.  No doubt I'll get used to them between now and then  
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Graham Bichard
Posted on: October 13th, 2013, 17:36:49 Quote Report to Moderator
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As for earthing the engine block, is the exhaust manifold nut any good?  (I suspect the conditions may be too hot and lead to failure/corrosion)

And do I need to earth the front subframe to the engine too?

Last modified October 13th, 2013, 17:37:41 by Graham Bichard
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Neil KilBane
Posted on: October 13th, 2013, 18:09:04 Quote Report to Moderator
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just a little fine tuning left to do.


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I brought an earth from the battery to one of the bolts for the top shock mount, then used that point to earth the engine block and electrics for the front of the car.

 
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Graham Bichard
Posted on: October 14th, 2013, 18:41:19 Quote Report to Moderator
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I've got the stud at the bulkhead to attach to Neil, but what did you attach the strap to on the engine?
And do you think I need to earth the front subframe seperately as well as the engine? (and the rear subframe too, really).
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jimnaylor
Posted on: October 14th, 2013, 18:54:14 Quote Report to Moderator
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The standard mini earth to the engine is from the subframe to a starter motor bolt. That also makes sure the connection is where the most current is required. Earth the subframe anywhere it's all electrically conductive. I connect inside the car to one of the subframe bolts through the floor at the back of the front subframe, but then again my cable is inside the car and I have no carpets.
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Graham Bichard
Posted on: October 14th, 2013, 19:04:07 Quote Report to Moderator
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Thanks Jim.
Have you got a seperate earth on the rear subframe also?  I've got one to the tank.
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jimnaylor
Posted on: October 14th, 2013, 19:14:33 Quote Report to Moderator
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I have a beam axle not a rear subframe, that is not earthed. But I have used one of the rear subframe mounting bolt holes to hold a bolt acting as a terminal to earth the tank and rear lights etc.
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Brian
Posted on: October 14th, 2013, 21:11:10 Quote Report to Moderator
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The subframes shouldn't _need_ to be grounded explicitly, unless you are using them for electrical connections.

The fuel tank wants to be grounded for two reasons -- one is that the fuel level sender often uses this connection, and you need a good stable ground connection for your gauge to be accurate. But, also, you want to make sure that there is no large voltage differential between  your fuel tank and other nearby pieces of metal. I.e. you're filling your car with gas, and touch the body of the car (on a metal car), you don't want to have a shock. So, it may be a good idea for the rear subframe to be connected to the fuel tank, since they're so nearby.

Also, I've heard that on older all-metal cars, large sheets of ungrounded metal (hoods, doors, etc) would have a tendency to cause radio interference. Not sure if it is because they are a large sheet of metal or due to their mass...if the latter, then it would probably be a good idea to make sure that all the metal on the car is electrically connected to eachother. This would be subframes, fuel tanks, roll cages, engine.

I said it before, but probably worth mentioning again: bolts/nuts aren't good conductors, so make sure that if you're using a bolt into a subframe or any other part, make sure that the things you want to be electrically conducted are physically touching eachother. If you want to ground a lug to a subframe, via a bolt, make sure to scratch some paint off the subframe, and that the bolt is just holding the lug into contact with the subframe. Otherwise, you'll end up with flaky grounds, which can cause weirdness with gauges, and other electrical issues.
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admin
Posted on: October 14th, 2013, 22:26:40 Quote Report to Moderator
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The fuel gauge sender usually has an earth tag on it, and this is the best way to earth the tank and sender.

Normally the two subframes will be connected by the brake line so if the front one has the usual strap to the engine there is no need to earth the rear subframe separately. Don't connect the battery to the rear subframe or you risk putting starter current through the brake line. An electric fuel pump needs a separate earth as it is insulated from its bracket on the subframe.

(ahem) I have used a bolt through the bulkhead crossmember to connect the earth cable from the battery (on the inside) to a strap to the engine. Actually it's a contact from a broken solenoid and I think it's copper plated steel. This has the advantage that I can earth the instruments, heater, etc on the inside.
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Simon Robinson
Posted on: October 15th, 2013, 07:34:47 Quote Report to Moderator
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Having had some "interesting" problems with dodgy electrical supply (the 'best' was when the live feed was corroded - switch on your indicator at 60mph and the whole car died...) make sure any connections are well protected from the elements. A good layer of copper grease will help.

D&H Mk IV 8313, KGV 215V (aka George) - 75,000 miles and counting since restoration in 2011.
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